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Call for Nominations: “Malaria Champions of the Americas 2016”

May 13, 2016
Description: On World Malaria Day 2016, the Pan American Health Organization launched the eighth annual Malaria Champions of the Americas contest. The annual search for the Malaria Champions of the Americas aims to identify and honor innovative efforts that have demonstrated success in malaria prevention, control, elimination, or prevention of reintroduction, and that have significantly contributed to overcoming the challenges of malaria on a local, national or regional level.


Nominations for the 2016 Malaria Champions of the Americas will be accepted from April 25 to June 20, 2016. For more information and nomination forms, click here.


Winners will be recognized in November 2016 during the commemoration of Malaria Day in the Americas.

Key Interventions Strengthen Health Systems to Address Malaria in Guatemala

May 2, 2016
Description: To achieve the goal of eliminating malaria in Guatemala, timely access to the appropriate treatment is a key strategy for the Ministry of Health and Social Assistance. After an assessment of the management of medicines and diagnostic supplies for malaria, the Systems for Improved Access to Pharmaceuticals and Services Program (SIAPS), in partnership with PAHO/WHO and Links Media, has been providing technical assistance to the ministry’s malaria sub-program for nationwide rollout of a set of interventions to improve management of malaria commodities. Find out more here.

World Malaria Day 2016: End Malaria for Good in the Americas

April 25, 2016
Description: “End malaria for good” is the theme for World Malaria Day on April 25, 2016. In 2015, the Americas celebrated having reduced malaria by 67% since the year 2000, and so far 18 countries in the region have committed to eliminating the disease in the coming years.


This is not the first time that countries of the Americas have set their sights on malaria elimination. Global eradication was proposed in the 1950s and 1960s. At that time, some countries successfully put an end to malaria, while others experienced a resurgence of the disease after coming very close to elimination. From this experience, we have learned that political and financial commitments have to be sustained over time. Moreover, we learned that we could not depend on the use of DDT as a single solution, but rather that the success of any elimination plan depends on the deployment of numerous components such as diagnosis, treatment, integrated vector management, surveillance, and communication.


We have also learned that when cases become increasingly few in number, control efforts and financial resources are often diminished, and health systems lose the capacities needed to successfully manage the disease and prevent outbreaks. Furthermore, the situation worsens and the threat increases for populations in remote areas, such as those that reside in the Amazon region and have limited access to quality health services for diagnosis and treatment. For their part, vectors and parasites adapt more rapidly to prevention and control measures implemented by countries. Parasites that become resistant to medicines — and malaria-transmitting mosquitoes that become resistant to insecticides — present great challenges, and threaten the progress made to date.


In spite of the difficulties, most countries have been able to accelerate efforts against malaria. With technical assistance obtained through regional networks like the Amazon Malaria Initiative (AMI) and the Amazon Network for the Surveillance of Antimalarial Drug Resistance (RAVREDA, by its Spanish acronym), countries of the Americas are well positioned to eliminate malaria. Such networks enable the coordination of operational research, the exchange of data, the supply of life-saving medicines, and the reinforcement of local capacity to confront malaria.


Since the year 2000, countries of the region have invested a great deal of time and money in reducing the number of cases of malaria. Nonetheless, with nearly 121 million people at risk of contracting the disease in the Americas, malaria continues to be a problem, having recently rebounded in countries such as Guyana, Nicaragua, Peru, and Venezuela. Therefore, national authorities should continue with concerted efforts to eliminate malaria.

Haiti Malaria Elimination Consortium (HaMEC) Is Formed

February 26, 2015
Description: The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation has awarded a $29.9 million grant to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to lead the new Haiti Malaria Elimination Consortium (HaMEC). HaMEC's objective will be to eliminate malaria from the island of Hispaniola by 2020. Eight other institutions make up the consortium. "We laud this expression of solidarity with efforts to eliminate malaria from the only two countries in the Caribbean [Haiti and the Dominican Republic] where transmission still exists..." said Dr. Keith Carter, Senior Advisor on Malaria and other Communicable Diseases with the Pan American Health Organization/World Health Organization, a consortium partner.

Latest News.

  • Call for Nominations: “Malaria Champions of the Americas 2016”
  • Key Interventions Strengthen Health Systems to Address Malaria in Guatemala
  • World Malaria Day 2016: End Malaria for Good in the Americas
  • Haiti Malaria Elimination Consortium (HaMEC) Is Formed

May 13, 2016
Description: On World Malaria Day 2016, the Pan American Health Organization launched the eighth annual Malaria Champions of the Americas contest. The annual search for the Malaria Champions of the Americas aims to identify and honor innovative efforts that have demonstrated success in malaria prevention, control, elimination, or prevention of reintroduction, and that have significantly contributed to overcoming the challenges of malaria on a local, national or regional level.


Nominations for the 2016 Malaria Champions of the Americas will be accepted from April 25 to June 20, 2016. For more information and nomination forms, click here.


Winners will be recognized in November 2016 during the commemoration of Malaria Day in the Americas.

May 2, 2016
Description: On World Malaria Day 2016, the Pan American Health Organization launched the eighth annual Malaria Champions of the Americas contest. The annual search for the Malaria Champions of the Americas aims to identify and honor innovative efforts that have demonstrated success in malaria prevention, control, elimination, or prevention of reintroduction, and that have significantly contributed to overcoming the challenges of malaria on a local, national or regional level. Nominations for the 2016 Malaria Champions of the Americas will be accepted from April 25 to June 20, 2016. For more information and nomination forms, click here.

April 25, 2016
Description: “End malaria for good” is the theme for World Malaria Day on April 25, 2016. In 2015, the Americas celebrated having reduced malaria by 67% since the year 2000, and so far 18 countries in the region have committed to eliminating the disease in the coming years.


This is not the first time that countries of the Americas have set their sights on malaria elimination. Global eradication was proposed in the 1950s and 1960s. At that time, some countries successfully put an end to malaria, while others experienced a resurgence of the disease after coming very close to elimination. From this experience, we have learned that political and financial commitments have to be sustained over time. Moreover, we learned that we could not depend on the use of DDT as a single solution, but rather that the success of any elimination plan depends on the deployment of numerous components such as diagnosis, treatment, integrated vector management, surveillance, and communication.


We have also learned that when cases become increasingly few in number, control efforts and financial resources are often diminished, and health systems lose the capacities needed to successfully manage the disease and prevent outbreaks. Furthermore, the situation worsens and the threat increases for populations in remote areas, such as those that reside in the Amazon region and have limited access to quality health services for diagnosis and treatment. For their part, vectors and parasites adapt more rapidly to prevention and control measures implemented by countries. Parasites that become resistant to medicines — and malaria-transmitting mosquitoes that become resistant to insecticides — present great challenges, and threaten the progress made to date.


In spite of the difficulties, most countries have been able to accelerate efforts against malaria. With technical assistance obtained through regional networks like the Amazon Malaria Initiative (AMI) and the Amazon Network for the Surveillance of Antimalarial Drug Resistance (RAVREDA, by its Spanish acronym), countries of the Americas are well positioned to eliminate malaria. Such networks enable the coordination of operational research, the exchange of data, the supply of life-saving medicines, and the reinforcement of local capacity to confront malaria.


Since the year 2000, countries of the region have invested a great deal of time and money in reducing the number of cases of malaria. Nonetheless, with nearly 121 million people at risk of contracting the disease in the Americas, malaria continues to be a problem, having recently rebounded in countries such as Guyana, Nicaragua, Peru, and Venezuela. Therefore, national authorities should continue with concerted efforts to eliminate malaria.

February 26, 2015
Description: The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation has awarded a $29.9 million grant to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to lead the new Haiti Malaria Elimination Consortium (HaMEC). HaMEC's objective will be to eliminate malaria from the island of Hispaniola by 2020. Eight other institutions make up the consortium. "We laud this expression of solidarity with efforts to eliminate malaria from the only two countries in the Caribbean [Haiti and the Dominican Republic] where transmission still exists..." said Dr. Keith Carter, Senior Advisor on Malaria and other Communicable Diseases with the Pan American Health Organization/World Health Organization, a consortium partner.

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Last updated on: 7/18/2016